Moorcock, Michael: 

Moorcock's most popular works by far have been the "Elric of Melniboné" stories. In these books, Elric is written as a deliberate reversal of what Moorcock saw as clichés commonly found in fantasy adventure novels inspired by the works of Tolkien, and a direct antithesis of Robert E. Howard's 'Conan'.

Central to many of his fantasy novels is the concept of an "Eternal Champion", who has potentially multiple identities across multiple dimensions of reality and alternative universes.This cosmology is called the "Multiverse" within his novels and is based on the concept which arose in particle physics in the 1960’s. The Multiverse deals with various primal polarities such as good and evil, Law and Chaos, and Order and Entropy.

The popularity of Elric has overshadowed his many other works, though he has worked a number of the themes of the Elric stories into his other works (the "Hawkmoon" and "Corum" novels, for example) and Elric appears in the Jerry Cornelius and Dancers at the End of Time cycles. His Eternal Champion sequence has been collected in two different editions of omnibus volumes totaling sixteen books (the U.S. edition was fifteen volumes, while the British edition was fourteen volumes, but due to various rights issues, the U.S. edition contained two volumes that were not included in the British edition, and the British edition likewise contained one volume that was not included in the U.S. edition) containing several books per volume, by Victor Gollancz in the UK and by White Wolf Publishing in the US.

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The Centipede Press Editions:

Finally, one of the true classics in the sword and sorcery genre gets the deluxe presentation that it has always deserved. These are archival editions, with gorgeous illustrations and featuring guest introductions from some of the top writers in the field. Each volume signed by the author, introducer and artists.

Robert E. Howard’s Conan of Cimmeria is generally credited with starting the boom in heroic fantasy that began in the late 1920s and has been with us ever since. He spawned lots of imitators, lots and lots of imitators…

In any event, after thirty years of Thongors, Elaks, Kyriks, Duars, Donters, Braks, Whacks, Thugs and Thwacks, readers were sick of it. Somewhere along the way the writers (with the exception of the redoubtable Fritz Leiber) had forgotten all about the sorcery part of the equation, leaving the basic plot being the lumbering oaf facing off against the frail but far smarter and more powerful sorcerer, who in some act of hubris would manage to screw everything up and wind up with his head in a bag.

To save us all, a young man from England arrived on the scene in the rather unlikely place of the pages of John Carnell’s Science Fantasy. Michael Moorcock wrote stories about a character that, without his soul-drinking sword, was too weak to raise himself off the couch. Readers had never seen anything quite like the albino prince before and initially weren’t sure what to make of him. Playing on the theme of the Ultimate Outsider, Moorcock’s protagonist wasn’t even human in the strictest sense. By the time the second novella saw print the readership had made up their minds: they loved Elric!

Lancer Books brought out a two-volume set of Elric stories in 1967. One featured the novel ‘Stormbringer', and the other book, 'Stealer of Souls', gathered up the short stories. More Elric work followed, such as 'The Sleeping Sorceress', 'The Weird of the White Wolf', and numerous other short stories, novellas and novels.

Now, for the first time, the titles, contents, and order of the Elric stories appear exactly as Michael Moorcock has long intended, making the Centipede Press editions (ultimately 9 volumes, with a tenth volume of archival artwork) the most definitive sets of these books ever made available.

'Elric of Melniboné' includes the novel of the same name and two short stories: “Master of Chaos” and “And So the Great Emperor Received His Education.” It also has an introduction by Holly Black and new artwork by Piotr Jablonski

Signed edition is limited to 300 copies, each signed by Michael Moorcock, Piotr Jablonski, and Holly Black.

Bound in full black cloth, stamped in three colors.

Color illustrations hand-tipped into the book with translucent overlays.

Introduction by Holly Black.

Oversize at 6½ × 9½ inches.

Gorgeous dustjacket.

Head and tail bands, ribbon marker.

Top-edge stain.


Published December 2018.





The early Elric stories were gathered in a Lancer paperback under the title of' Stealer of Souls', this led to a follow-up novel ‘ tormbringer' which apparently brought things to their logical conclusion. Indeed, there’s an anarchistic raging against the machine in the early Elric stories that is almost palpable to the point that there are more than a few of us scholars of the genre who believe that Moorcock needed his time with the pioneers of space-rock, Hawkwind, just to mellow out a tad…

What Michael Mooorcock has done is evolve from the angry young man who gave us 'Stealer of Souls' to the witty and sophisticated author who is now considered one of our greatest living fantasists, and the Elric character has grown with him. Moorcock simply realized that there was far more to Elric’s story and how he grew from the spoiled princeling with a huge sense of entitlement to the doomed and noble figure he becomes in the end. What we have in 'Fortress of the Pearl' is Moorcock now at the height of his prowess as a novelist revisiting the early history of a young Elric. The stories and novels that Moorcock wrote to fill in the blanks in the Elric saga are very obviously necessary pieces of the puzzle that had been left out. Without these revisions, it is literally impossible for the Elric of 'Stealer of Souls' to become the Elric of ‘Stormbringer'.

Signed edition is limited to 300 copies, each signed by Michael Moorcock, Tom Kidd, and Neil Gaiman.

Bound in full black cloth, stamped in three colors.

Color illustrations hand-tipped into the book with translucent overlays.

Introduction by Neil Gaiman.

Oversize at 6½ × 9½ inches.

Gorgeous dustjacket.

Head and tail bands, ribbon marker.

Top-edge stain.


Published December 2018.





Crossovers between an author’s most popular characters occur but rarely, with some of the most intriguing possibilities left untouched or else picked up by other writers practicing the form of literary pastiche. Arthur Conan Doyle never had the cerebral Sherlock Holmes consult on a case with the explosive Professor Challenger. Indeed, most authors avoided the idea entirely, or gave it remarkably short shrift. Robert E. Howard brought Bran Mak Morn and Kull of Valusia together briefly in “Kings of the Night.” C.L. Moore had her Jirel of Joiry meet up with Northwest Smith in one memorable story. But only Michael Moorcock had the genius and audacity to bring four of his major characters together in a full-length novel and then play the trump card that reveals the four characters to all be in effect, the same man as different spokes of the cosmic wheel, avatars of the Eternal Champion. 

In 'The Sailor on the Seas of Fate', Moorcock brings together Prince Corum Jhaelen Irsei, the Prince in the Scarlet Robe, (protagonist of six novels), Erekose, (the titular hero of 'The Eternal Champion' and four other novels), Dorian Hawkmoon, (the lead of nine volumes which incorporate the two series, 'The History of the Runestaff' and 'Chronicles of Castle Brass'), with his lead character Elric of Melniboné. What we do have here, is the stripped down, essential Elric, with this being the third of the Essential Elric volumes, lavishly illustrated and finally presented in the sort of fine volumes that the work has always demanded.   

Signed edition is limited to 300 copies, each signed by Michael Moorcock, Richard Hescox, and Michael Chabon.

Bound in full black cloth, stamped in three colors.

Color illustrations hand-tipped into the book with translucent overlays.

Introduction by Michael Chabon.

Oversize at 6½ × 9½ inches.

Gorgeous dustjacket.

Head and tail bands, ribbon marker.

Top-edge stain.


Published December 2018.





Elric of Melnibone makes his return in what will no doubt be acclaimed as one of the very best chapters in the saga of the doomed albino prince. While many of you may recall reading this installment in the series as 'The Vanishing Tower', Mr. Moorcock has made substantial alterations to the text, bringing it up to the quality that you have come to expect from the author who is certainly in the discussion as Britain’s greatest living fantasist. It’s true that at the time of original publication, fair claims could be made that Moorcock wrote many of the “fill-in-the-gaps” stories and novels in a tremendous hurry at the insistence of publishers who knew that they had a goldmine in Elric and weren’t entirely sure that the same degree of success was in the cards for Jerry Cornelius…

It has all worked out for the best; the intervening years have given Moorcock the opportunity to revise and shore up these additional pieces, (all of which take place before the events recounted in ‘Stormbringer'), and rather than the work being done by a writer in a tremendous hurry, trying to juggle the editing of the legendary magazine, New Worlds with the authoring of a great many new novels as a demanding publisher eager for more of their “sure thing” hung over his shoulder like so many vultures. We have the results of one of the greatest fantasists in the world applying his energies to carefully revise and rewrite these additions to the Elric series bringing them up to the highest possible level of quality.

This volume focuses mainly on Elric’s opposition to the Melnibonean sorcerer, Theleb Ka’arna, who on the surface does not initially appear to be a worthy opponent, however, it is Elric’s own self-absorption and angst that allows Theleb Ka’arna opportunities to both escape Elric’s rage and to catch him in traps that by all rights he should have avoided. Moorcock deftly utilizes Elric’s flaws in order to build page-turning suspense that is almost unique to the sword and sorcery genre. In much of the genre we expect the brawny (if not necessarily brainy) hero to somehow muddle along and by sheer luck as much as anything else defeat the much smarter sorcerer, usually done in by his own hubris. In the Elric saga, we are given a character as capable of wielding a powerful spell as he is adept at wielding the vampiric black blade, Stormbringer.

'The Sleeping Sorceress' includes the novel of the same name and two short stories: “The Singing Citdael” and “While the Gods Laugh.” It also has an introduction by Walter Mosley and new artwork by Tyler Jacobson. 

Signed edition is limited to 300 copies, each signed by Michael Moorcock, Tyler Jacobson, and Walter Mosley.

Bound in full black cloth, stamped in three colors.

Color illustrations hand-tipped into the book with translucent overlays.

Introduction by Walter Mosley.

Oversize at 6½ × 9½ inches.

Gorgeous dustjacket.

Head and tail bands, ribbon marker.

Top-edge stain.

Published February 2020.






The Eternal Champion Series:

The Millennium set

         

  

                                                                                                                                  Millennium - First Editions

White Wolf Series:

  

          White Wolf Publishing - First Edition                                                     White Wolf Publishing - TPB                                         White Wolf Publishing - First Edition    

  

                                                                                                                      White Wolf Publishing - First Editions 

                                                                                                                                                    ✣

    

                                                      Phoenix House - First Editions                                                             WH Allen - First Edition                                              Harrap - First Edition        

    

                                                      Guild - Book Club Editions                                                                          BCA - Book Club Edition                                      Granada - First Edition

     

                              Grafton - First Edition                                                                  Gollancz - First Edition                                                                          TPB's

    

                              Jonathan Cape - First Edition                                                       Harmony - First Edition                                                                           BBC

    

                                Guild - Book Club Edition                                                       Grafton - First Edition                                                                   Orion - First Edition

Paperbacks:

The Millennium set

           

                                                                                                                             TPB's

 

                                         TPB                                                                                     TPB                                                                                             TPB    

   

                                               TPB                                                                                         TPB-B 

   

                                                                                                                       B-Format’s


                                 B-Format