Art Books 

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Whilst we don’t really collect large format books sometimes you can’t help yourself, but what to do once you have a large book?. Ideally large books are there to be visually appealing hence the whole coffee table thing, something to browse, which is a great idea if you’re a dentist. Since we aren’t, unfortunately ours have languished out of sight for quite a while which in retrospect is a shame because the art in some of these is just amazing. 

The one thing about SF/Fantasy is that it is inextricably linked to great art and as such its not surprising that there are quite a few books out there celebrating cover art and the artists. In addition to art appreciation works we also have some pictorial books that we’ve picked up along the way. We’ve tried to show some of the book interiors here to give some idea of the content.











             

     

    

    

     

 

   

  

                 

                 

   

   

   

                                               

   

                                                

     

                                                 

                                                

   

                      Workman Publishing - First Edition                                            Harper Prism - First Edition                                                          Galahad - First Edition                             

                     

There is some amazing stuff out there that you just don’t know about until you stumble on it, like this oversize illustrated hardcover below from  Paper Tiger, published in 1981, by Una Woodruff. The artwork is just out there. If you enjoy simply browsing through fantasy art then this is for you. 

The story itself is set in 1681 following the life of Lady Elizabeth Hurnshaw. A regal woman from England. Elizabeth and her husband always had an affection for botany and when her husband passes away suddenly, Elizabeth and her son set out on an adventure to journey to the Americas. They instead stumble upon an island called Amarantos, or later would be referred to as the lost island of Atlantis.  They spend twenty years studying and documenting the strange flora and fauna of this island.  Later they return to Europe with their illustrations, only to disappear again not long after.  The colourful illustrations within Amarant showcase all the findings from their time on Amarantos.